Independent Contractors v. Employees: A Slippery Slope

Date: Available 24/7 CLE Credits: 1 General

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Course Description

This program was recorded on January 25th, 2019

Many employers engage workers as independent contractors rather than as employees, believing that they can enjoy administrative convenience or save money. Unfortunately, few employers are aware of the dangers of misclassifying workers. This course will discuss the differences between employees and independent contractors under the law. Both the IRS and the Department of Labor have jurisdiction over workers and each can prosecute an employer for failing to comply with tax law or labor law, respectively. 



  • Kenneth Sprang
    Kenneth A. Sprang is one of the founding partners of Washington International Business Counsel, LLP, in Washington, DC. Mr. Sprang counsels and represents both domestic and international clients in a wide range of corporate, business and transactional matters, as well as in labor and employment, employee benefits and real estate issues. Over the course of his 30 plus year career, Mr. Sprang has practiced with both large and small firms, as well as serving as in house counsel for Fortune 500 companies and as general counsel to smaller companies.

    Mr. Sprang began his career with Morgan, Lewis & Bockius, a large, multi-national firm. Subsequently, he served as in house counsel in the legal departments of Calgon Corporation, a former subsidiary of Merck & Co., Inc., and Cyclops Corporation, a Fortune 500 specialty steel manufacturer. Later, Mr. Sprang founded legal departments and served as in-house general counsel for several start-up and other privately-held companies, including a hospital and a web-based company. Mr. Sprang has also spent several years as a full-time law professor, and continues teaching property law and a labor seminar as an Adjunct Professor at Catholic University of America, Columbus School of Law in Washington, D.C.

    Contact Kenneth Sprang
      • 1 General Credit
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      Each On-Demand course is available to you for 1 year from date of purchase. Additionally, CLE credit is only available within that year.
    1. Criteria for distinguishing a contractor from an employee
    2. Penalties for misclassification
    3. Strategies for avoiding all misclassification
    4. Avoiding class action litigation for DOL or other claims
    5. Cost differences between employees and contractors

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